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Interviews » The estate agent’s guide to artisan baking: Iain Sinclair interviewed (published 28/07/2015)

We find a bench that allows me to have the station sign in frame. I go to reference my two pages of typed notes, carefully assembled from a binge back-to-back reading of London Overground and Black Apples of Gower but an easterly gust of wind hoists them into the sky and over the high wall into the garden of the Geffrye Museum. Iain laughs. Don’t worry I assure him, the impressions of both books are firmly stamped on my mind, I probably had too many questions anyway – we’d freewheel it, follow the drift of conversation.

Iain Sinclair returns to 3:AM while John Rogers keeps the camera running.

Interviews » “an accidental novel”: Iain Sinclair interviewed (published 26/11/2014)

The 70 x 70 book is more than just a record of this filmic dérive around London, it is a repertory cinema season on paper, the SCALA brought back to life in print; a revival of the world of wall-charts peppered with classics by Fritz Lang, Douglas Sirk, Godard, unheralded oddities, all-nighters interrupted at 4am by a punk band to keep you awake. But it is also a form of autobiography, weaving a path through Sinclair’s life and work as he discusses the background to each selection, or “an accidental novel”, as he describes it.

John Rogers interviews Iain Sinclair on his 70×70 book.

Interviews » Free-Thinking London Babble: My Fucked Interview With Iain Sinclair (published 11/11/2006)

An easy interview. Iain Sinclair sits genially and talks into the recorder for over an hour, and there’s the sly undercurrent in this of a benign Sir William Gull instructing the ignorant Netley of the ventricles of London, England’s heart, as they turn down Greenwood Road as far as Albion Drive to survey London Fields and the suburb of Hackney containing the overspill of the East End. I’m the duff Netley, the stuttering ignoramus, wrestling with the recording machine and then failing to register its weird failure. Two hours later, speeding away in an unwashed van cluttered with dead paperbacks, used up Costa paper cups and rotten apple cores, I’m clicking the corpse button trying for the replay and finding nothing but white noise.

By Richard Marshall.

Reviews » Recurrent Unconsidered Joy: A review of Hidden Valleys by Justin Barton (published 19/08/2015)

Hidden Valleys involves a large amount of country wandering, though with more precarity than the Armitages and MacFarlanes are currently enduring. During Barton’s teenage years, he and his mother travelled the country from hotel to hostel, town to village, against the sour backdrop of familial strife and a contested will. His investment in the landscape, then, was everything but professional.

Cal Revely-Calder on Hidden Valleys by Justin Barton.

Reviews » exiled from daylight (published 27/07/2015)

Nightwalking is a meticulously researched yet eminently readable and entertaining guide to London at night and on foot – with a radical heart. It is also a sweeping history of London, from the Middle Ages to the late-Victorian period.

Julian Hanna reviews Matthew Beaumont‘s Nightwalking.

Reviews » Back in Orbit (published 08/07/2015)

Over a decade after London Orbital, Iain Sinclair went on another circular journey. This walk, shorter but no less demanding, was prompted by his encounter with a group of youngsters in fancy dress about to board an Overground train at New Cross Gate to travel to a party in Shoreditch. They told him how they chose locations for parties somewhere along the newly completed Ginger Line and kept the details secret till the last moment. Reminded of the famous M25 raves that started soon after the opening of the London orbital motorway in 1986, Sinclair felt compelled to write about the revived rail network: to see how it had changed London’s topography and spirit.

Anna Aslanyan reviews Iain Sinclair‘s London Overground: A Day’s Walk Around the Ginger Line.

Buzzwords » Film Without Film (published 28/03/2015)

Post-Nearly Press are publishing two volumes of in-depth interviews with Chris Petit and Iain Sinclair, both conducted by Neil Jackson. Only a limited number of copies will be produced. “When they’re gone that’s it,” says Neil, “it’s a theme that crops up in the conversations.”

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 26/01/2015)

Cinema without people (via Gorse). * An interview with 3:AM legend Richard Cabut. * Brian Dillon on Gerhard Richter. * Brian Dillon on the topless cellist. * Sam Cooper on the novel after its abandonment. * Enrique Vila-Matas in The White Review‘s translation issue. * Translating the untranslatable. * Untranslatability studies. * Towards an alternative […]

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 16/12/2014)

Crazy in love. * Elena Ferrante: “I didn’t choose anonymity; I chose absence”. * An interview with Laure Prouvost. * Tom McCarthy on reality, realism, and the real. * Tom McCarthy on Gravity’s Rainbow. * Simon Critchley: suicide — a defence. * Erasing Duchamp. * An interview with Cioran. * Paul Muldoon on Beckett. * […]

Reviews » Tara Morgana (published 26/10/2014)

As ever, Holman is asking that we recognize those deeper, magical roots of writing that modern poetic literature has always recognized – think of Yeats, mystical Eliot, Ted Hughes. He’s working to unfreeze a secular cultural cringe that blushes embarrassment at the supernatural, mystical, occult elements and can’t engage with that vast content… Holman is working to receive occult forces where ‘… each dreamed text is a terma in the mind, treasure best left to be forgotten and then discovered anew.’

Richard Marshall reviews Paul Holman’s Tara Morgana.