:: Search Results

Reviews » Stewart Home’s po-mo homer (published 29/12/2013)

Stewart Home’s ecstatic absurdity is an assault on modern culture bringing a Homeric pre-Socratic anti-Platonism to the table on the twin-back fun-ride of the funky German materialism started in the 1850s and the materialist-based Marxism a little later.

Richard Marshall on Stewart Home’s Proletarian Post-Modernism.

Essays » Stewart Home vs Heidegger (published 23/04/2012)

again2Home has always been political. He attacks lazy green anarchists because of their racism. He attacks high culture for the same anti-fascist reasons. Conversation and internationalism and peace is what his underlying mission is. He identifies with Black Atlantic movements and claims a radical inauthenticity since 1962. Everything in Home is apportioned to scribble over every idea Heidegger ever had. High culture is just the obvious site of his attention. It confuses some critics who can’t quite work out what their problem is . So they ask of his novels: Are they extreme pulp? Are they po-mo jokes? Are they anti-novels? And his art generally confuses people who are really still hung up with Heideggerian notions of authenticity and want to find something serious in modern high art.

Richard Marshall on the Stewart Home retrospective, Again, A Time Machine.

Essays » In Bed with Tracey Emin & Stewart Home (published 20/05/2011)

artstrikebedWhat strange bedfellows Emin and Home make. Two artists so utterly different that they are almost each other’s opposites, if such a thing were possible. What they do share perhaps is a punk attitude, but not much else. Emin is truly an artist of her time, whether you rate her work or not. Like reality television she is uncomplicated, exhibitionist, soul-baring and embarrassing . She has become an art establishment figure, measured in fame and money, Tory-supporting and angry about paying higher rate tax, political only in a Daily Mail sense. Home on the other hand remains anti-establishment, avant-garde and a communist. His work is oblique, opaque, avowedly non-personal and overtly political, as likely to attack anarchists and counter-culture figures as capitalism or the monarchy. Where Emin is mercurial and sexually traumatised, Home is detached and playful. Emin tells you her truth, and Home challenges you about the nature of truth and its perception. Emin is television, Home is internet.

By Andrew Scott-Bolton.

Buzzwords » Stewart Home in Paris (published 14/03/2011)

On Saturday 19 March, Stewart Home will be in conversation with Florence Ostende at Galerie Martine Aboucaya (5 rue Sainte Anastase, 75003 Paris), to promote the French edition of Blood Rites of the Bourgeoisie (Rites sanglants de la bourgeoisie). The event is free and begins at 5.30pm.

Reviews » Utopian Connotations and Stewart Home Industries (published 01/09/2007)

lf.jpgThe study builds upon Piaget’s theory of moral development in children, extending his concepts into the sphere of political morality and choice. A series of hypotheses is offered, and tests are used to measure whether Piaget’s theories are relevant to judgments about political matters. The findings from the interviewing provide strong support for the thesis that moral development theory has major utility in the study of political socialization.

Interviews » Stewart Home (published 09/04/2007)

ncro.gifI think there is a lot to be criticised about so called Web 2.0 (centralisation, commercialisation, profit capitalism etc.), but it also marks the onset of the web as a real mass phenomenon, where it is really changing the social environment and where one can’t ignore it. We’ve got now what the hype was telling us we’d have a dozen years ago.

Stewart Home becomes the only author to have three interviews on 3:AM, courtesy of Michael K.

Buzzwords » 3:AM Top 5: Stewart Home (published 14/10/2006)

Stewart Home, who read at the Trocchi night the other evening, has asked us to draw your attention to the following project of his: LONDON ART TRIPPING: Stewart Home takes you on a journey from west to east London as a way of delineating the psychogeographical shifts of London’s cultural centres over fifty years. The […]

Buzzwords » Stewart Home & Jack The Stripper (published 02/06/2006)

Stewart Home (pictured), who made a celebrated impromptu appearance at 3:AM‘s book launch on Monday, has written a review of David Seabrook‘s Jack of Jumps (Granta, 2006) in which you can “discover the name of the bloke he insinuates is Jack the Stripper (but doesn’t actually name) and a critique of his complete lack of […]

Reviews » The Defiant Prose of Stewart Home (published 09/08/2001)

His use of deceit and plagiarism is a light-hearted prank, a thrust against the fetish of originality and genius that he sees as being part of the structure of modern notions of art, especially perhaps in fiction writing that draws attention to the power of such ideas. Similarly, the use of shared names, such as Karen Elliot, Luthor Blissett, Monty Cantsin are equally prankster routines designed to reveal modern art’s need for the genius. The unsettling of these ideas–of drawing attention to the fact that ‘Art’ is structured around concepts of genius, of originality, of creativity by producing things that look like art but don’t involve them–is of course what these routines are about. But such work can have surprisingly violent effects and what is interesting about Home is the way he continues to direct his writing through the present age and its canonical authors, philosophers and artists towards a different kind of future.

By Richard Marshall.

Buzzwords » An Evening with University of Greenwich writer in residence Paul Ewen, and special guests (published 19/05/2015)

Greenwich Book Festival Old Royal Naval College Friday, 22 May 2015 from 7pm onwards Paul Ewen (pictured), author of Francis Plug – How To Be A Public Author, recently longlisted for the Gordon Burn Prize is very proud to host an evening with three of the UK’s most unconventional writers, all working outside the literary […]