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VicLeka published 15/01/2017

Vic Godard & A.M.Leka Exhibition: VicLeka 27 – 31 January 2017 GALLERY 46 46 Ashfield Street, London E1 2AJ Related: 2014 review / 2002 interview at 3:AM

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“Brutalism in Ruins?” published 11/01/2017

Prof. Christoph Lindner (University of Oregon) and Owen Hatherley Fri 27 January 2017, 18:30 – 21:00 Science Museum, 165 Queens Gate, London SW7 5HD Free entry (registration link) Adopting a transnational and comparative approach, Prof. Lindner will examine the connections between brutalist architecture, ruin aesthetics, hipsterfication, and the violence of globalization in locations as diverse […]

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The Face of Stuckism published 10/01/2017

By E A Everall: 12 January – 5 February 2017 The Stone Space, Leytonstone Church Lane, London E11 1HG (@thestonespace) E A Everall is a founder-member of Stuckism, the infamous international ‘outsider’ art movement. Founded in 1999, Stuckism originated as a riposte to the then dominance of ‘conceptualism’ and non-painting in general and is committed to […]

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Derek Parfit RIP 1942-2017 published 04/01/2017

A philosopher’s philosopher, very influential and impressive. His argument regarding the unimportance of personal identity led to these reflections: ‘When I believed [that personal identity is what matters], I seemed imprisoned in myself. My life seemed like a glass tunnel, through which I was moving faster every year, and at the end of which there […]

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Top Reads of 2016: Hestia Peppe published 27/12/2016

The task of describing one’s or indeed any one experience of reading in 2016 is daunting. It’s daunting because, in a lifetime of heavy reading I don’t think there’s been a year when I read more. When I say reading I am aware now that to speak only of reading literature or even words is […]

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Top Reads of 2016: Eley Williams published 24/12/2016

Books for which I was thankful this year.   1. ‘Monuments are interesting mostly in how they diminish all other aspects of the landscape. Each highly perceptible thing makes something else almost imperceptible. This is so matter of fact, but I’ve been told I’m incomprehensible: Anne, what do you mean that noticing one thing can […]

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Top Reads of 2016: Richard Marshall published 23/12/2016

12 of what I’ve read this year: The Genesis of Neo-Kantianism, 1796-1880. Frederick Beiser. Beiser is an essential read and this is a great and readable book about an important sub-field of continental philosophy. It includes, for the Beckett fans amongst us, a chapter on Windelband, one of whose books Beckett read and from which […]

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Top Reads of 2016: Dustin Illingworth published 22/12/2016

I spent 2016 writing (well, rewriting) a novel—a grueling, often dispiriting process. The books on this list, then, were not merely brilliant reading experiences, but rather something like lifelines, mantras, affirmations. I carried them to restaurants and bars, I read them on planes, I kept them at my desk as if mere proximity might convey […]

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Top Reads of 2016: Mark de Silva published

Yuri Herrera’s novels seem to me not merely good or even very good, but something much more rare: consequential. Signs Preceding the End of the World (2015) and The Transmigration of Bodies (2016) are metaphysical noir exhibiting intense allegorical compression—both come in around 100 pages—while remaining convincingly grounded in the borderlands of this world. These […]

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Top Reads of 2016: Andrew Gallix published 18/12/2016

  My book of the year was Claire-Louise Bennett’s Pond, which, technically, came out in 2015, but has haunted me ever since first reading it. This is where the future of fiction in English is being written. Joanna Walsh is also pushing back boundaries in both fiction (Vertigo) and nonfiction (Hotel). With Hot Milk, Deborah Levy produced […]

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