:: Interviews archive ( click for A-Z index)

The Return of Ol’ Skank-Eyes published 30/04/2016

scotlan yardie

There were offers for me to do comedy writing and presenting spoof documentary stuff but it was terrible stuff they wanted me to do. There was one production company that wanted me to do one on the Ten Best Things That Slavery Had Given Us! I couldn’t get my head round where they were coming from with that one. Slavery? Really? It was an abhorrent idea as a pitch and I was trying to work out how it would work. I mean, I asked them: “what kind of thing are you thinking about?” and they were giving me shit like; “Well, the chains could have turned to wearing gold chains…” Jeez. Well. Fuck that!

Richard Marshall interviews legendary Scotlan Yardie author Bobby Joseph.

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The Philosopher’s Library (Part 2) published 24/04/2016

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John McDowell’s Mind, Value and Reality, a great collection of essays. From an earlier period of analytic philosophy, Bernard Williams’s Moral Luck, Thomas Nagel’s Mortal Questions, Nelson Goodman’s Ways of Worldmaking. We are having a reading group at Sussex on G.E.M. Anscombe’s Intention, if you fancy some hard work, this very slim volume is recommended.

Book recommendations from philosophers interviewed as part of the End Times series.

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Political Philosophy published 23/04/2016

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Marx tried to avoid moral criticism of capitalism, and this is one of the points of differentiation between ‘scientific’ and ‘utopian’ socialism. The scientific socialist is the person who understands the forces of history, especially the fact that capitalism must inevitably break down to be replaced by communism. The role of the scientific socialist is to bring this process to light so that it can be hastened. But once it is doubted that there is any such fact that capitalism must break down, the only form of socialism available, is ‘utopian’ socialism, which argues for communism on moral grounds. So it is the failure of history to follow the theory of scientific socialism, if indeed it does fail, that leads to moralism.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Jonathan Wolff.

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The Rationalist Theist published 16/04/2016

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Either the Theist says that God wills things because they’re good (in which case he or she is committed to there being something independent of and prior to God’s creation, a standard of goodness that could be thought to limit His sovereignty and perhaps constrain His actions) or things get to be good simply because of the fact that God wills them to be so (in which case the substance of morality might be thought to be arbitrary; God could have made torturing puppies morally obligatory). Amongst philosophers who have written on this topic, I am unusual – possibly to the point of uniqueness – in thinking that actually all the major ways of ‘solving’ this so-called dilemma work.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Tim Mawson.

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buddhist ethics published 08/04/2016

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I think the philosophical interest in Lojong is in ideas about how moral development works. A lot of philosophers in the West take after Aristotle and think of moral development on the model of developing a skill. It’s almost taken to be a truism that the way to develop a virtue is by doing the actions associated with the virtue. You get to be a generous person by doing generous actions, a just person by doing just actions, and so on. I think Lojong puts pressure on this; it is a collection of techniques for developing morally important traits like compassion, selflessness, and kindness that doesn’t involve doing any of those actions. I think it offers a well-developed picture of how we can also cultivate virtue via imaginative practices that should be more central in how philosophers think about moral development in general.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Nicolas Bommarito.

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Kant’s Historical Turn published 01/04/2016

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One main oddity in many post-Kantian and Anglophone discussions of Kantian autonomy has been that they understand it basically as just a matter of an individual acting rationally on principles of its own choosing. But Kant’s own notion of autonomy is not captured by the notions of individuality, choice, and rationality, for he stresses that people make individual rational choices that generally are immoral, e.g., merely prudent rather than respectful of the necessary equal value in the dignity of persons as such. Hence, common liberal endorsements as well as conservative or radical criticisms of Kant–for a stress merely on individual rational choice as such–are all fundamentally misguided.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Karl Ameriks.

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Eight questions for Idra Novey published 30/03/2016

Eight Questions for Idra Novey

I’d like to think that we can all be saved by story, at least temporarily, and it may not be a story in a book. It could be a story we overhear on the bus, or from a friend, or relative.

Tristan Foster interviews Idra Novey.

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Paradoxes and Their Logic published 27/03/2016

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Dialetheism is the view that there are true contradictions, i.e. true claims of the form ‘P and not-P’ (or ‘P and it is not the case that P’). For example, I mentioned ‘this sentence is not true’ earlier. According to standard versions of dialetheism, this sentence is in fact both true and not. So the claim to this effect would be an example of a true contradiction. Why adopt such a crazy view? The apparently most promising argument, which had been stressed by Graham Priest, was essentially this: one should adopt this view because any more orthodox solution of paradoxes such as the Liar will involve severe expressive restrictions.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Bruno Whittle.

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Colour published 20/03/2016

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This is a species of color realism because it allows that
colors are perfectly real and instantiated properties. No one would
infer from the relationality of sisterhood to the unreality of
sisters. Likewise, color relationalism offers a way of accepting color
realism, and so avoiding the eliminativist’s extreme skepticism — but
without the unprincipled, ad hoc stipulations required by the many
other forms of realism that insist on an exclusively veridical variant
in cases of perceptual variation.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Jonathan Cohen.

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The Philosopher’s Library (Part 1) published

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Since I don’t really read fiction, I don’t think I have been influenced by it in any way. On the odd occasions I do read, I like fiction that explores philosophical ideas. The novels of Sartre and Dostoievski are obvious examples. I also love the short stories of Borges. These are the closest thing to philosophy-fiction, if there is such a genre.

15 Philosophers recommend books for your bookshelves taken from the End Times series.

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