:: Interviews archive ( click for A-Z index)

Paradoxes published 29/11/2014

I encounter people who are dealing with paradoxical situations in their own lives. One woman, for example, told me that she is now wondering whether she is living with the same person she married twenty years ago. “He’s the same man, of course,” she admitted, “but he has changed so drastically, I’m not really sure he’s the same person.”

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Margaret Cuonzo.

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An Ultimate You: Fantasyscapes and Youtube Aesthetics published 28/11/2014

I was also into the idea of referencing homemade youtube videos. So it was really mad low tech effects and the kind of thing that you get teenagers uploading to youtube. With the new films – A Whole New World and Please Sir – I was looking at reference points for landscapes, digital cgi landscapes, and kind of looking more to that video game aesthetic. It doesn’t look real but it seems to have developed its own reality. It’s a hyperreality – so detailed that it doesn’t match what we see in real life.

Ivan Knapp interviews the artist, filmmaker and 2013 Margaret Tait award winner, Rachel Maclean.

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“an accidental novel”: Iain Sinclair interviewed published 26/11/2014

The 70 x 70 book is more than just a record of this filmic dérive around London, it is a repertory cinema season on paper, the SCALA brought back to life in print; a revival of the world of wall-charts peppered with classics by Fritz Lang, Douglas Sirk, Godard, unheralded oddities, all-nighters interrupted at 4am by a punk band to keep you awake. But it is also a form of autobiography, weaving a path through Sinclair’s life and work as he discusses the background to each selection, or “an accidental novel”, as he describes it.

John Rogers interviews Iain Sinclair on his 70×70 book.

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On The Romantic Absolute published 21/11/2014

Schlegel’s claim is that philosophy does not concern any one topic, nor does it amount to any one conception of truth or reality; rather, it is in a state of eternal conflict, such that it is only by grasping the various conflicts within philosophy––determining the ways they emerged, and were resolved or dissipated––that we can grasp what philosophy is about.Schlegel similarly argues that literature must be understood through its history. In his lectures on the history of European literature he maintains that “the new cannot be understood without the old,” because “literature can only be understood as a whole.” In other words, in order to understand the nature of literature one must grasp the history of literature.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Dalia Nassar.

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Parts, wholes, abstracts, tropes and ontology published 14/11/2014

A book may be part of the library and a page part of the book, but the page is intuitively not part of the library. By contrast, if an amount of rice is part of a larger amount of rice, which in turn is part of a dish, the first amount of rice is still part of the dish. This is because amounts of rice are not integrated wholes, whereas books are.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Friederike Moltmann.

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powers, Aristotle and the incarnation published 08/11/2014

Powers are properties that enable their bearer to bring about or suffer change. Each (type of) power is defined by the (type of) change it is ‘responsible’ for. The change is the manifestation of the nature of the power. Importantly, manifesting is one of the two different states a power may be in; the other is being inactive. Powers are real even if never manifesting. Even a changeless universe may be powerful.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Anna Marmodoro .

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Crash and Burn:
Debating Accelerationism
published 04/11/2014

Presenting capitalism as a parasite (I always think of Futurama’s brain slugs) implies that we simply shrug off the parasite to get back to a neutral technological or cultural possibility. I think capitalism shapes our context and existence in subtler ways than that, although it is always a contradictory social formation. While I would say there is no simple “outside” to capitalism, I don’t think this is a counsel of despair because I’d attend to the contradictions and struggle that always and everywhere exist within this social relation.

Alexander Galloway in conversation with Benjamin Noys.

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Plato aims at virtue published 31/10/2014

I certainly would not say that Plato hates poetry; rather, he is amazed by and concerned about its persuasive power. I think it is precisely this power he tries to acquire and control with his own beautiful and poetic writing. It would be a fair summary of Plato’s work to see it obsessed, from the very opening lines of the Apology, with the relationship between persuasion and truth. How and why is it that the truth so often fails to be persuasive? What has to occur to make the truth persuasive?

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Iakovos Vasiliou.

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Leibniz: Strange monads, esoteric harmony and love published 24/10/2014

I think one of the things that makes people react to Leibniz in the way that Diderot did is the sheer breadth of his accomplishments. Setting aside his achievements in any particular field, Leibniz is clearly one of the greatest polymaths the world has ever seen. He is well-known as an important philosopher, mathematician, and natural philosopher and, to a lesser degree for his pioneering writings on jurisprudence, linguistics, and geology. But also his work extended to more practical endeavours, including inventions such as his early calculating machine, his designs for wind driven water pumps for use in mining, and a submarine. In one letter he even mentions an idea for shoes with springs underneath to facilitate quick escape from pursuers.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Paul Lodge.

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Category Mistakes published 17/10/2014

I haven’t been able to find a natural language that doesn’t contain category mistakes (it’s hard to imagine how there could be such a language – but I’m not just relying on this intuition. I asked speakers of a wide range of languages and all of them confirmed there are sentences that are odd in precisely this sort of way in their languages). Moreover, even within a language, category mistakes can arise in the context of very diverse grammatical constructions.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Ofra Magidor.

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