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Art » A Personal Golgotha (published 19/05/2018)

It’s all DIY  – hardly proof-read and done too fast in between day jobs to be anything but jump-start writing. So forget about the writing. What matters is what its about. It adds up to a boss reading list and a cranked up gang of characters smoking up the haunted back bars of the eerie early morning. 3:AM’s been around since 2000 and I joined Gallix’s punkstorm early on. It’s one of the oldest literary sites on the web. And back in the early days there was hardly anything out there so we were literally making it up as we went along.

Keep Up: a 3:AM backlist.

Essays » Ann Quin: a Peculiar Fish Without Fins (Blurring, Filth, and Smut. Or, What Ann Quin Means To Me) (published 05/04/2018)

What is a blur? Can a blur be colossal and awe-inspiring? Can grime equate to more than the sum of its parts? We are faced with the image of a blurred window. A window frames what we look at, through it, it serves as a lens to the world outside, we see what it allows us to see, but when this lens is blurred, smudged with grime, what do we see? The grime? Or what we imagine – through experience or memory – what’s on the other side? Quin’s window stands before us from the outset, before anything, obscuring our view. In smothering her subjects and themes this way, Quin’s corrosion serves to magnify her intentions. Berg is dirty. Quin is dirty. Her writing is smeared with filth.

Lee Rourke on Ann Quin.

Buzzwords » Under The Paving Stones (published 27/12/2017)

19th February @ The Social, 5 Little Portland St, W1 Faber Social and Tony White Present: UNDER THE PAVING STONES: A Night of Experimental Fiction Featuring readings from: KIRSTY GUNN ‘Gunn’s prose is accomplished, poetic, and haunting.’ Times Literary Supplement TONY WHITE ‘A serious, engaging voice of the modern city’ Guardian STEWART HOME ‘Stewart Home is one […]

Reviews » More 3:AM Books of the Year (published 20/12/2017)

When the last Woolworth’s finally closed, the sexual playground of a haunted English eroticism was lost forever. Glen Zipes’s urgent little book recalls the misery of the strange pathologies of the grim mauve sadness and holiness of these sacrilegious shopping emporia. Zipes writes badly, and there are moments when it isn’t easy to separate his own state of mind from the worlds he describes. But there is a seedy love here, somewhere between murder and onanism, and we all know that that is the exact territory of our lonely essential significance.

More Books of the Year from 3:AM Magazine.

Buzzwords » Artists Against Overdevelopment (published 07/10/2017)

Bowater House, Golden Lane Estate, London EC1Y 0RJ. View from Fann Street, EC1. October 5 – December 10. Spectres of Modernism is an installation of protest art banners emblazoned with slogans dreamt up by leading artists and writers including Turner Prize winners Jeremy Deller and Elizabeth Price and Booker Prize nominated author Tom McCarthy. The […]

Interviews » The Hacker (published 10/06/2017)

As Debord said, theories are made to die in the war of time. They are of their era. There’s no shortage of cranky pro-situs who claim ownership of the Situationists, like petit-bourgeois shop-keepers. But I think it’s better to treat it as material to refunction rather than repeat. It’s not for imitating, it’s for treating as raw material. That’s why the hardcovers of my books on the Situs come with comic strips that I made with Kevin Pyle, as a bit of a hint about how to repurpose the material now.

Richard Marshall interviews McKenzie Wark.

Interviews » Sounds » Psychobilly, qu’est-ce que c’est? (published 27/03/2017)

I was a mod 1980-1986, I then got into Acid Jazz, I took my first E in ‘88, 89 and I kind of thought, as I’d always been interested in mods in the sixties getting into acid, that mods had gone two ways, they’d either become skinheads or took acid. And I thought that in the eighties that was our acid period, that was our Haight-Ashbury, our summer of love and I was a year or so late to it, but I remember thinking that ‘This is it! Ecstasy will unite the world!’, it’ll whatever.

Andrew Stevens talks subcultures and pulp fiction with Paul Hallam.

Essays » Lumpenproletariat. Writing Attack/Antisystem/Subliterature (published 03/01/2017)

These are properly “deconstructive texts” in the sense that they burlesque rather than conventionally critique: they occupy the very language of disenfranchisement that is otherwise employed to demonstrate that they do not really exist. There is nothing of a Foucauldian paradigm here: this is not some pretence to an authentic voice of the excluded, a critique of the history of reason from the POV of the madwoman in the attic. The truly subversive character of the sublit project is that it is first and foremost a “locus” of détourning action – a radical poetics – a tropism. While the theorisers of the recuperated avantgarde toil to contain and expropriate the thing they imagine subliterature to be, their grasp necessarily comes up empty: there’s nothing to grasp, in any case, but a hologram of their own transgressed image, which they are more than adept at attending to.

Louis Armand on the Sublit Project.

Interviews » This Is The Place To Be: An Interview with Lara Pawson (published 23/11/2016)

While people may think that someone who writes about such intimacy can’t possibly be nervous, they’d be wrong. I still feel unsettled by this aspect of the work. That’s part of what makes it a difficult book to discuss. In truth, I’m also a little afraid that in talking about my book, I risk damaging the work itself. My mouth might tread all over the text. I don’t want that to happen. I want the text to speak for itself. I feel very protective of the text.

Lara Pawson, interviewed by Rebekah Weikel.

Reviews » 600 Years Of Defiant Pose (published 27/08/2016)

At the fag-end of the 1980’s … writing’s anti-authorial, anti-purist, anti-linear, anti-referential and deeply linguistic character was something in the air then. It was an update of Joyce’s ‘polyglottal’ ‘Wake’ project, a sexier, more chic version … that works with and through language, a clash of two codes, textual and bibliographic, but with a further density to the polysemy and plurivocity added, that of a fragmented elucidation. Acker and others – Bill Burroughs was another clear example – were writing monsters of subversion where theme, narrative, character and plot were their targets. Words were no longer subject to the equation that they meant just one thing, or even one cluster of things. Meaning was now just an effect of language not of anything lying within or behind it. Authorial intention and determination was eroded and instead labyrinths of possibility and acrostic sampling were being produced in a kind of hip, punk slippage to indeterminancy. The improvisory, intermedial experience of reading became a biological-emotional state of hyper-real decision making and play.

Richard Marshall reviews the 25th Anniversary Edition of Stewart Home‘s Defiant Pose.


 

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