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Interviews » The Other London Perambulator: John Rogers (published 26/09/2016)

There were a few cases of consciously not recreating things in the book. For example, there’s a wonderful section in the book about Iain’s relationship with Angela Carter. She’s great. When I interviewed Iain about the book, I was really curious about that because that is another London that doesn’t quite exist anymore, a literary London. It’s kind of dead really, at least in that form. So he’s still book dealing, and she can do a profile on him in the LRB and that can have transformative effects. What I loved about it is that there’s a lunch in Bloomsbury to celebrate an article in the LRB and that just doesn’t happen now.

Adam Scovell interviews John Rogers about his recent London Overground film with Iain Sinclair.

Reviews » 600 Years Of Defiant Pose (published 27/08/2016)

At the fag-end of the 1980’s … writing’s anti-authorial, anti-purist, anti-linear, anti-referential and deeply linguistic character was something in the air then. It was an update of Joyce’s ‘polyglottal’ ‘Wake’ project, a sexier, more chic version … that works with and through language, a clash of two codes, textual and bibliographic, but with a further density to the polysemy and plurivocity added, that of a fragmented elucidation. Acker and others – Bill Burroughs was another clear example – were writing monsters of subversion where theme, narrative, character and plot were their targets. Words were no longer subject to the equation that they meant just one thing, or even one cluster of things. Meaning was now just an effect of language not of anything lying within or behind it. Authorial intention and determination was eroded and instead labyrinths of possibility and acrostic sampling were being produced in a kind of hip, punk slippage to indeterminancy. The improvisory, intermedial experience of reading became a biological-emotional state of hyper-real decision making and play.

Richard Marshall reviews the 25th Anniversary Edition of Stewart Home‘s Defiant Pose.

Reviews » Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London (published 15/08/2016)

The flâneur has been a liberal-creative archetype almost as long as there have been cities – what Lauren Elkin describes as ‘a 19th-century phenomenon – the flâneur, a figure of privilege and leisure, with the time and money to amble around the city at will.’ Origins of the phenomenon were romantic and delirious: however, British contemporary literature can make anything dull and these days flâneuring consists of Iain Sinclair or Will Self, picking endlessly around a London orbital – or some young man of the Brutalist movement, blinking in rapture at tower blocks.

Max Dunbar reviews Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London by Lauren Elkin.

Buzzwords » London Overground World Premiere (published 22/06/2016)

By John Rogers. London Overground retraces Iain Sinclair’s journey with film-maker Andrew Kötting around the Overground railway for the book of the same name. The film covers the ground over the course of a year rather than the day’s walk of the book. Iain is once again joined by Kötting in parts, along with Chris […]

Reviews » Enthusiasm (published 23/12/2015)

He works in the limits of what he calls, as an abbreviation for the complexities, ‘enthusiasm.’ Of course there’s not a single proposition attached to that label. But it is something ‘not limited by anything & the imagination of flight is apparently a mild head cold to the viral germ warfare we ought suddenly employ when thinking about what we might do with our future time…’. That is the ultimate focus. No summarized norms, epistemic stances calibrated to measure the dreamed metaphysical ghouls, maybe even harness them, or drive a stake through to a heart, or a yacht to navigate territories. ‘Water/ doesn’t need a boat you arrogant fuck.

Richard Marshall reviews S.J. Fowler‘s ‘Enthusiasm.’

Interviews » A Radical Homosexual Refutes the Implicit Sexuality of a Young Woman in Appalling Black Glasses: M. Kitchell on the Topics of Solar Luxuriance and Publishing in the Twenty-First Century (published 03/11/2015)

I’m much more interested in publishing works that fit the idea of what I think books should do. I believe that the function of books lies beyond representational language, beyond being an easy way to encounter language, and there aren’t many presses doing anything interesting with that. But then again, there don’t seem to be many writers doing things like that.

Jarett Kobek interviews M. Kitchell from Solar Luxuriance.

Interviews » The Indie Press Interviews 1: Charles Boyle (published 14/10/2015)

If you’ve got an office with the water-coolers and the sofas, and have staff, you have to sell a heck of a lot of books to maintain that situation. I’m not paying staff, I don’t work from an office: I have almost no overheads. My expenses are printing bills and small author advances, usually around £200 against 10% royalties, sometimes a little more. Small presses don’t have big risks. If a mainstream publisher publishes a book and it doesn’t sell, it’s considered a mistake. If I publish a book and it doesn’t sell, hey, nobody’s lost their livliehood, nobody’s drowned. It was something I thought was worth doing. You see, I don’t see it as my business to sell thousands of books. It sounds a bit naive, but I see publishing as a continuation of my reading and writing. They blur into one another. I am just sharing what I enthuse about.

James Tookey interviews Charles Boyle, author and founder of CB Editions.

Reviews » Recurrent Unconsidered Joy: A review of Hidden Valleys by Justin Barton (published 19/08/2015)

Hidden Valleys involves a large amount of country wandering, though with more precarity than the Armitages and MacFarlanes are currently enduring. During Barton’s teenage years, he and his mother travelled the country from hotel to hostel, town to village, against the sour backdrop of familial strife and a contested will. His investment in the landscape, then, was everything but professional.

Cal Revely-Calder on Hidden Valleys by Justin Barton.

Reviews » exiled from daylight (published 27/07/2015)

Nightwalking is a meticulously researched yet eminently readable and entertaining guide to London at night and on foot – with a radical heart. It is also a sweeping history of London, from the Middle Ages to the late-Victorian period.

Julian Hanna reviews Matthew Beaumont‘s Nightwalking.

Reviews » Back in Orbit (published 08/07/2015)

Over a decade after London Orbital, Iain Sinclair went on another circular journey. This walk, shorter but no less demanding, was prompted by his encounter with a group of youngsters in fancy dress about to board an Overground train at New Cross Gate to travel to a party in Shoreditch. They told him how they chose locations for parties somewhere along the newly completed Ginger Line and kept the details secret till the last moment. Reminded of the famous M25 raves that started soon after the opening of the London orbital motorway in 1986, Sinclair felt compelled to write about the revived rail network: to see how it had changed London’s topography and spirit.

Anna Aslanyan reviews Iain Sinclair‘s London Overground: A Day’s Walk Around the Ginger Line.