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Interviews » The Indie Press Interviews 1: Charles Boyle (published 14/10/2015)

If you’ve got an office with the water-coolers and the sofas, and have staff, you have to sell a heck of a lot of books to maintain that situation. I’m not paying staff, I don’t work from an office: I have almost no overheads. My expenses are printing bills and small author advances, usually around £200 against 10% royalties, sometimes a little more. Small presses don’t have big risks. If a mainstream publisher publishes a book and it doesn’t sell, it’s considered a mistake. If I publish a book and it doesn’t sell, hey, nobody’s lost their livliehood, nobody’s drowned. It was something I thought was worth doing. You see, I don’t see it as my business to sell thousands of books. It sounds a bit naive, but I see publishing as a continuation of my reading and writing. They blur into one another. I am just sharing what I enthuse about.

James Tookey interviews Charles Boyle, author and founder of CB Editions.

Reviews » Recurrent Unconsidered Joy: A review of Hidden Valleys by Justin Barton (published 19/08/2015)

Hidden Valleys involves a large amount of country wandering, though with more precarity than the Armitages and MacFarlanes are currently enduring. During Barton’s teenage years, he and his mother travelled the country from hotel to hostel, town to village, against the sour backdrop of familial strife and a contested will. His investment in the landscape, then, was everything but professional.

Cal Revely-Calder on Hidden Valleys by Justin Barton.

Reviews » exiled from daylight (published 27/07/2015)

Nightwalking is a meticulously researched yet eminently readable and entertaining guide to London at night and on foot – with a radical heart. It is also a sweeping history of London, from the Middle Ages to the late-Victorian period.

Julian Hanna reviews Matthew Beaumont‘s Nightwalking.

Reviews » Back in Orbit (published 08/07/2015)

Over a decade after London Orbital, Iain Sinclair went on another circular journey. This walk, shorter but no less demanding, was prompted by his encounter with a group of youngsters in fancy dress about to board an Overground train at New Cross Gate to travel to a party in Shoreditch. They told him how they chose locations for parties somewhere along the newly completed Ginger Line and kept the details secret till the last moment. Reminded of the famous M25 raves that started soon after the opening of the London orbital motorway in 1986, Sinclair felt compelled to write about the revived rail network: to see how it had changed London’s topography and spirit.

Anna Aslanyan reviews Iain Sinclair‘s London Overground: A Day’s Walk Around the Ginger Line.

Buzzwords » Film Without Film (published 28/03/2015)

Post-Nearly Press are publishing two volumes of in-depth interviews with Chris Petit and Iain Sinclair, both conducted by Neil Jackson. Only a limited number of copies will be produced. “When they’re gone that’s it,” says Neil, “it’s a theme that crops up in the conversations.”

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 26/01/2015)

Cinema without people (via Gorse). * An interview with 3:AM legend Richard Cabut. * Brian Dillon on Gerhard Richter. * Brian Dillon on the topless cellist. * Sam Cooper on the novel after its abandonment. * Enrique Vila-Matas in The White Review‘s translation issue. * Translating the untranslatable. * Untranslatability studies. * Towards an alternative […]

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 16/12/2014)

Crazy in love. * Elena Ferrante: “I didn’t choose anonymity; I chose absence”. * An interview with Laure Prouvost. * Tom McCarthy on reality, realism, and the real. * Tom McCarthy on Gravity’s Rainbow. * Simon Critchley: suicide — a defence. * Erasing Duchamp. * An interview with Cioran. * Paul Muldoon on Beckett. * […]

Reviews » Tara Morgana (published 26/10/2014)

As ever, Holman is asking that we recognize those deeper, magical roots of writing that modern poetic literature has always recognized – think of Yeats, mystical Eliot, Ted Hughes. He’s working to unfreeze a secular cultural cringe that blushes embarrassment at the supernatural, mystical, occult elements and can’t engage with that vast content… Holman is working to receive occult forces where ‘… each dreamed text is a terma in the mind, treasure best left to be forgotten and then discovered anew.’

Richard Marshall reviews Paul Holman’s Tara Morgana.

Essays » The Artist Pioneer: East London and the ‘Stripped-Pine Pioneers’ (published 25/10/2014)

Since the 1960s a picture has emerged. A collective language of urban development, which paints artists – to use a generic conglomeration of fine artists, writers, architects, photographers and filmmakers – as urban pioneers. It would seem this has become the portrait of urban renewal. Artists as what Jonathan Raban so cuttingly called the ‘stripped-pine pioneers’. First-wave foot soldiers of gentrification. Boldly marching beyond the frontiers of well-trod quartiers, in search of new, cheap, interesting spaces to live and work.

Bea Moyes on the development of the East End.

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 18/05/2014)

The Invisible Book. * On Francesca Woodman. * Ben Lerner: “I came here tonight to open you up / To interference heard as music”. * Ben Lerner on Knausgaard. * Karl Ove Knausgaard on spring. * Out to where storytelling does not reach. * Art does not know a beyond. * The Absolution of Roberto […]