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Reviews » exiled from daylight (published 27/07/2015)

Nightwalking is a meticulously researched yet eminently readable and entertaining guide to London at night and on foot – with a radical heart. It is also a sweeping history of London, from the Middle Ages to the late-Victorian period.

Julian Hanna reviews Matthew Beaumont‘s Nightwalking.

Reviews » Back in Orbit (published 08/07/2015)

Over a decade after London Orbital, Iain Sinclair went on another circular journey. This walk, shorter but no less demanding, was prompted by his encounter with a group of youngsters in fancy dress about to board an Overground train at New Cross Gate to travel to a party in Shoreditch. They told him how they chose locations for parties somewhere along the newly completed Ginger Line and kept the details secret till the last moment. Reminded of the famous M25 raves that started soon after the opening of the London orbital motorway in 1986, Sinclair felt compelled to write about the revived rail network: to see how it had changed London’s topography and spirit.

Anna Aslanyan reviews Iain Sinclair‘s London Overground: A Day’s Walk Around the Ginger Line.

Buzzwords » Film Without Film (published 28/03/2015)

Post-Nearly Press are publishing two volumes of in-depth interviews with Chris Petit and Iain Sinclair, both conducted by Neil Jackson. Only a limited number of copies will be produced. “When they’re gone that’s it,” says Neil, “it’s a theme that crops up in the conversations.”

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 26/01/2015)

Cinema without people (via Gorse). * An interview with 3:AM legend Richard Cabut. * Brian Dillon on Gerhard Richter. * Brian Dillon on the topless cellist. * Sam Cooper on the novel after its abandonment. * Enrique Vila-Matas in The White Review‘s translation issue. * Translating the untranslatable. * Untranslatability studies. * Towards an alternative […]

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 16/12/2014)

Crazy in love. * Elena Ferrante: “I didn’t choose anonymity; I chose absence”. * An interview with Laure Prouvost. * Tom McCarthy on reality, realism, and the real. * Tom McCarthy on Gravity’s Rainbow. * Simon Critchley: suicide — a defence. * Erasing Duchamp. * An interview with Cioran. * Paul Muldoon on Beckett. * […]

Reviews » Tara Morgana (published 26/10/2014)

As ever, Holman is asking that we recognize those deeper, magical roots of writing that modern poetic literature has always recognized – think of Yeats, mystical Eliot, Ted Hughes. He’s working to unfreeze a secular cultural cringe that blushes embarrassment at the supernatural, mystical, occult elements and can’t engage with that vast content… Holman is working to receive occult forces where ‘… each dreamed text is a terma in the mind, treasure best left to be forgotten and then discovered anew.’

Richard Marshall reviews Paul Holman’s Tara Morgana.

Essays » The Artist Pioneer: East London and the ‘Stripped-Pine Pioneers’ (published 25/10/2014)

Since the 1960s a picture has emerged. A collective language of urban development, which paints artists – to use a generic conglomeration of fine artists, writers, architects, photographers and filmmakers – as urban pioneers. It would seem this has become the portrait of urban renewal. Artists as what Jonathan Raban so cuttingly called the ‘stripped-pine pioneers’. First-wave foot soldiers of gentrification. Boldly marching beyond the frontiers of well-trod quartiers, in search of new, cheap, interesting spaces to live and work.

Bea Moyes on the development of the East End.

Buzzwords » The Missing Links (published 18/05/2014)

The Invisible Book. * On Francesca Woodman. * Ben Lerner: “I came here tonight to open you up / To interference heard as music”. * Ben Lerner on Knausgaard. * Karl Ove Knausgaard on spring. * Out to where storytelling does not reach. * Art does not know a beyond. * The Absolution of Roberto […]

Interviews » Edgeland: Marshland (published 20/03/2014)

Language and writing often tries to appropriate places and make them understandable. Take the Romantics as an example. Before the Romantics, hills, the Lake District and the countryside were just a wilderness, it was ugly, no one wanted to go there because there were bandits and wolves there. Why would you want to leave the triumph of the Enlightenment in the cities? But the Romantics came along and said, ‘That’s quite pretty’. So for a while language became about describing this exciting new place. Then it got into the Gothic and it became clichéd and all the rest of it, to the point where you couldn’t write about it anymore.

Kit Caless records Simon Spanton in conversation with Gareth E Rees.

Interviews » debunking the anxiety of influence (published 04/12/2013)

Red Tales was fundamentally about the image; entering ideas through the image. I wanted to push the story into a different direction. I had this idea of interweaving fragments and narrative; of poetry and narrative and the image coming to the forefront. I was fascinated by art and installations and even saw writing as a cheaper way of building these spaces. It was also very much about processing experiences.

Joanna Pocock in conversation with Susana Medina .