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Interviews » The End Times » Colour (published 20/03/2016)

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This is a species of color realism because it allows that
colors are perfectly real and instantiated properties. No one would
infer from the relationality of sisterhood to the unreality of
sisters. Likewise, color relationalism offers a way of accepting color
realism, and so avoiding the eliminativist’s extreme skepticism — but
without the unprincipled, ad hoc stipulations required by the many
other forms of realism that insist on an exclusively veridical variant
in cases of perceptual variation.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Jonathan Cohen.

Interviews » The End Times » The Philosopher’s Library (Part 1) (published )

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Since I don’t really read fiction, I don’t think I have been influenced by it in any way. On the odd occasions I do read, I like fiction that explores philosophical ideas. The novels of Sartre and Dostoievski are obvious examples. I also love the short stories of Borges. These are the closest thing to philosophy-fiction, if there is such a genre.

15 Philosophers recommend books for your bookshelves taken from the End Times series.

Fiction » Paris 13/11: Zorn and Genet (published )

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When a man invents an image that he wants to propagate, that he may even want to substitute for himself, he starts by experimenting, making mistakes, sketching out freaks and other non-viable monsters that he has to tear up unless they disintegrate of their own accord. But the operative image is the one that’s left after the person dies or withdraws from the world, as in the case of Socrates, Christ, Saladin, Saint-Just and so on. They succeeded in projecting an image around themselves and into the future. It doesn’t matter whether or not the image corresponds to what they were really like: they managed to wrest a powerful image from that reality.

Culled lines from Fritz Zorn and Jean Genet in response to hearing Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam had admitted he wanted to blow himself up but then changed his mind.

Fiction » Poetry » Paris 13/11: Kierkegaard and Akhmatova (published )

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Do it or don’t do it — you will regret both. A revolutionary but passionless and reflecting age changes the manifestation of power into a dialectical sleight-of-hand, letting everything remain but slyly defrauding it of its meaning; it culminates, instead of in an uprising, in the exhaustion of the inner reality of the relationships, in a reflecting tension that nevertheless lets everything remain; and it has transformed the whole of existence into an equivocation.

Culled lines from Kierkegaard and Akhmatova in response to hearing that Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam had admitted he wanted to blow himself up but then changed his mind.

Interviews » The End Times » Bigger Than Chaos (published 19/03/2016)

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In the nineteenth century, scientists and government statisticians began to find fairly stable social trends: rates of marriage, suicide, undeliverable letters and other unfortunate events tended to stay much the same from year to year (though the rates differed from place to place). Further, these patterns could be captured quite well using the mathematics of probability, which was fast maturing at the time. There was great hope for a science of society that would replicate the success of the science of inert matter—a “social physics”.

That hope turned out to be premature.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Michael Strevens.

Interviews » The End Times » Not and Other Metalinguistic Stuff (published 12/03/2016)

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Transparency, in the relevant sense of the word, is a property of certain linguistic contexts. It’s a property they have if they permit the substitution of co-referring terms. For example, before he encountered Darth Vader in Cloud City, Luke Skywalker knew that Anakin Skywalker was his father. He didn’t know that Darth Vader was his father. It came as quite a shock to him, after all, when he learned the sad truth. But ‘Darth Vader’ and ‘Anakin Skywalker’ refer to the same man. So the context ‘Luke Skywalker knew that _ was his father’ fails to be transparent. Only transparent contexts license the sort of inference needed to challenge monism.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Mahrad Almotahari.

Interviews » The End Times » imagination supposition, imagine. (published 29/02/2016)

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The topic of imagination can evoke fancy, dreams, artistic abilities, in contrast with reality, facts, scientific abilities. Clearly this is a cliché and imagination, as I tried to show beforehand, is strongly connected to knowledge and the sciences. Stereotypically the humanities in general are tied to women, whereas the sciences to men. Moreover, among the humanities philosophy emerges as more masculine than languages or literature, for instance. But this does not stop here. Analytic philosophy is stereotypically masculine (though analytic feminism is increasing its visibility).

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Margherita Arcangeli.

Interviews » The End Times » The Pyrrhonian Skeptic (published 28/02/2016)

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The conversation I am interested in is also facilitated by the fact that most Greek philosophy pre-dates monotheistic premises. This doesn’t mean that for Plato, Aristotle, Chrysippus, Epicurus, and so on, there is no such thing as divinity. But for them it is a question, and not one to which the answer is simply available, how one should think of a god. And for all the ancients know, the soul may well be physical. The main interlocutors of ancient skeptics, Stoics and Epicureans, think so. This is one reason why ancient skeptics would not come up with external world skepticism. To them, it is an alien idea that ‘the mind’ is different in the relevant, radical way, from ‘the world.’ Instead it is a highly complex part of the world. I think this is along the right lines, and a good reason to study these theories.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Katja Vogt, with images by Jens Haas.

Reviews » I Hate the Internet (published )

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With the nasty-eyed sharpness of Swift, Burroughs or Houellebecq Kobek writes a tripwire just above the level for walking. Everyone falls down. It’s a satire about losing track of the world. How? It takes a swipe at those that suppose we’re tracking the world we’re in, rather than just the world. The result of that first-person engorgement is a fetishised digitalized idiocy exposed as a blank hate state, a bleak panorama of digitised repression balanced on the corrosive manipulative belief in a centred world. If Donald Trump is the personification of the centred-world, then Kobek’s satire can be directed towards him and all he stands for.

Richard Marshall reviews Jarett Kobek’s I Hate the Internet.

Interviews » The End Times » All About the Ego Tunnel (published 25/02/2016)

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Conscious experience as such is an exclusively internal affair: Once all functional properties of your brain are fixed, the character of subjective experience is determined as well. If there was no unidirectional flow of time on the level of inner experience, then we would live our conscious lives in a bubble, perhaps like some simple animals or certain mystics – locked into an eternal Now. However, our phenomenal model of reality is not only 3D, but 4D: Subjective time flows forward, the phenomenal self is embedded into this flow, an inner history unfolds. That it is why it is not a bubble, but a tunnel.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Thomas K Metzinger.