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BUZZWORDS

PEDDLING MIND PORN TO THE
CHATTERING CLASSES SINCE 2000
by Andrew Gallix and Utahna Faith

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      [14.10.06] [Andrew Gallix]
    3:AM REVIEW: THE FRATELLIS' COSTELLO MUSIC
    "Rowdy riffs, punked-up drumming, and an angry Scotsman with Dylanesque hair shouting hoarsely": Richard O'Brien reviews Costello Music, The Fratellis' debut album

    Everything you really need to know about The Fratellis can be summed up in one song: debut single "Creeping Up The Backstairs". It had rowdy riffs, punked-up drumming, and an angry Scotsman with Dylanesque hair shouting hoarsely on the subject of how he was "just here to get drunk again". Nearly all their early demos were essentially reinterpretations of this same sublime cocktail. On the album, they branch out a bit, with a slice of jaunty balladry on "Whistle For The Choir", and a few moments of Beatlesy ring-a-ding and woozy "ohh-ahh"s and "lalala"s to balance out the general tone of fortified mob-indie. This is music with an obvious popular appeal, best achieved on previous single "Chelsea Dagger", where a simple smashed drumbeat and strutting bass collide with a raucous football chant refrain
    that simply cannot be resisted. Vocalist Jon understands the power of narrative lyrics, and also when to leave them out. He's just as effective screaming "it's alright, and it's alright", as he is throwing out lines about "crucifix bones all covered in cellophane". The delivery is suitably hotwired throughout, with his fierce accent lending a cathartic edge to his vivid tales of has beens, addicts and general Glasgow scum.

    ABOUT THE REVIEWER:
    Richard O'Brien was born in Peterborough in 1990, and has been trying to escape ever since. He is currently still trying to get an education, and resides in a Lincolnshire village with his parents and his labradors with nautical names. He likes to act, listen to music, and write songs that will never be sung.

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