Fiction and Poetry 3am Magazine Contact Links Submission Guidelines
Literature
Arts
Politics
Nonfiction
Music
 
3 A.M. ARTS: Books, Film, & Life
Articles, stories, essays, and documentaries from the artistic world as featured in previous editions of 3 A.M. MAGAZINE.


TRUST: AN INTERVIEW WITH HANS NELEMAN
June, 2004

"The project came about after I had walked into a 'bar' in Guatemala on vacation. Not aware it was a place of prostitution, I was surprised when a 'waitress' made advances. The image of this toothless, black-eyed, scarred siren who tried to kiss me with her blistered lips as she keeled over backwards stayed with me for about a year. I went back with my 8x10 camera." Hans Neleman talks to Richard Marshall about tarts, tattoos, and trust.

THE ARTIST AS MARXIST
May, 2004

"So I guess I'm feeling more in fashion than I was ten years ago! And what do these figures have to say? Well, one of the things that's been happening and encourages their rehabilitation, if that's what they need, is that people have been thinking about Capitalism as a global system. For a long time throughout the Cold War whenever critiques were mounted against Capitalism, the very common and effective reply was look at the other system. It's worse. Now that system's gone and there isn't that recourse any longer. Capitalism is all you have pretty much! With one or two isolated exceptions. The overall economic and cultural picture is not that pretty, and there's nowhere else to put the blame." Richard Marshall interviews Julian Stallabrass.

ONE IN THE EYE FOR THE FAKES
December, 2003

"There is an anger deep in my unconscious. I would have killed people if I didn't have art or writing. I would have gone down the road of the psychopath, but I managed to beat my father up at the age of 21 and that saved a lot of misery." Richard Cabut interviews painter, poet, novelist, musician, green-tea drinker and all-round dyslexic genius Billy Childish, as a retrospective exhibition opens in London.

NOT A YBA IN SIGHT
December, 2003

"A Dansette-style record player emits the crystalline strains of garage rock in the corner, barely audible over the chatter of the assembled viewers in Euston's Aquarium gallery one Saturday evening in November. Just after teatime. 30-somethings mill around, some with pushchairs, others with babies in pouches on their fronts. Surprisingly there are no regulars from London's eager, young and hip Dirty Water Club. It is the opening night of Billy Childish' We Are All Phonies exhibition and the bar isn't free." Andrew Stevens reviews The Aquarium's Billy Childish exhibition.

OUT OF THE DARKNESS
September, 2003

"I refused to call Deborah Harry anything but that. Everyone called her Debbie. I said, I won't have a Debbie in my film. She laughed, and we got on fine together. Now she's universally Deborah. At the time, Blondie wasn't known in the States - Heart Of Glass only hit number one while we were filming. I'd already spent some time here in the UK and I knew she was worth taking a chance on. She put her soul into her screen test and it was very moving. Obviously, she had an edge, and she wasn't afraid to appear ridiculous or ugly. For a beautiful woman in cinema this is absolutely essential. I wrote the screenplay in November and we were filming in March. It all happened that fast." Richard Marshall interviews Marcus Reichert.

NOSTALGIA STOPS HERE
August, 2003

"Booze was a catalyst in the Situ lifestyle of talk and revolt, of doing nothing on a grand scale, of drift and derangement, creation and destruction, of traversing an environment you could only find by chance and whose pleasures were random and furtive -- a signpost to a world of adventure. Guy Debord was considered a great theorist until he wrote the first volume of his memoirs, after which it became clear that he was an even greater drinker -- and that boozing was, in fact, more important to him." Richard Cabut reviews The Aquarium's Situationist exhibition in London.

JANET CARDIFF, GEORGE BURES MILLER AND PHILIP DICORCIA: WHITECHAPEL ART GALLERY, LONDON (JUNE-AUGUST 2003)
August, 2003

"It was interesting to see how people did choose to respond when faced with this ascetic holy noise: one man, clearly angry at the passive chant, grabbed a speaker, attempting to rip it from its frame. Another man looked close to tears. Other restless cynics looked contemptuous of the naive contemplation conjured from the commercial space of the centre of the gallery. Others simply gave in to the sheer selfless sadness and lonely terror of the spiritual intensity, and closed their eyes." By Greg Whitfield.

ANXIETY ATTACK
July, 2003

"Was this part of the display? Should they react or just stare? Should they feel embarrassed, nervous, or have a go themselves? Gallery security looked flustered: what were they to do? Call the manager? The police? Or was it indeed, 'part of the show'"? Greg Whitfield reviews Monica Bonvicini's exhibition at Modern Art Oxford (21 June-17 August 2003).

LONDON LOVER: AN INTERVIEW WITH LIGHTWORK'S ANDY LAVENDER
May, 2003

"I'm conscious at the moment of not making political work with a very ostensibly social output; not through deliberate choice, it's just that I'm focusing on different things, which are more intrinsic to the way the medium ticks. I'm attempting to wrestle with process and structure. Perhaps that's not just me, my own interest. Almost as a cultural turn we can't escape the shapes in which we work. I'm very interested in how individuals express themselves within a larger network. So that sense of networking and connecting means that you can't articulate your own independent vision independently, and that has a lot of bearing on ideas of authorship and meaning. That inevitably plays out in the kind of theatre that we make and the way that we make it." Richard Marshall interviews Andy Lavender.

PINK GADGETS: BOOK REVIEW OF OLAF NICOLAI'S 'ENJOY /SURVIVE'
February, 2003

"This sort of thinking leads me on to think about what kind of soundtrack would I want to go with this sense of wonderment . It can all seem extravagant and strange - like astronauts playing golf on the moon - but it gives me the possibility of a kind of self-respect that otherwise I'm not sure I'd be capable of. We eat to soundtracks, and drive to them. Fuck to them. Shop to them. We do everything to them. When we drive its like we want to have our own 2D ambient moviedrome sequence -the pre-recorded tape/CD makes sure we have some sort of control over the streaming 3D reality beyond the windscreen which is made more real because it is like TV even though of course it isn't as real as TV, being 3D out there." By Richard Marshall.

REVIEW: RIAN HUGHES DEVICE "ART, COMMERCIAL"
February, 2003

"Comics are a unique creature in the Western cultural annals. At moments, on this side of the world we have seen it embraced by the arts culture en masse, when Liechtenstein picked up his brush, when pop became vogue, when R.Crumb, hermetic master of the comic underworld suddenly sprang, the bow tied deviant and heavily bespectacled anti-hero of his own documentary, like some perverted bizzaro world version of Barney Fife, onto the applauding screens of film festivals around the globe." By Jonathan Carr.

ART AND POLITICS
December, 2002

"We have constructed the virtual state of NSK, which has more citizens than the Vatican, and which brings to light a new paradigm: the state without territory but in time, the global state that proves there is no ordinary state anymore." Mr Greg interviews Peter Mlakar of the NSK.

GETTING PIERCED
December, 2002

"Suddenly trapped in the Proustian ambush of remembrances, I see that seventeen-year-old girl who, assaulted by doubts, was wondering about how right and moral her decision was. At that time she still believed in morality. It was her first time and it is my first piercing." Read about Federica Rossi's first time.

VIRTUAL PREY
November, 2002

"I'd like to think we all secretly love sexist trash. Virtual Prey is not the story of a victim, but a fighter. When the player eventually wins the game, they will discover Raven is a full-on Vigilante and takes her revenge with extreme prejudice." Richard Marshall interviews Adam Prusan and Mitch Lerman, the team behind Virtual Prey.

THE BATH
November, 2002

"The artist asked me to come back the next day to experience the bath again and to take some pictures. I said yes immediately. It's like all the other disgusting and repugnant things that I can never stop doing." Federica Rossi undergoes a strange cleansing process at the Liverpool Biennial.

NEVER KNEW NEVER FROM LESS: SECONDARY RAW MATERIALS OF HARRY HOOGSTRATEN
September, 2002

"Everyone knows the origin of art. It has its morphogenesis, or structural beginning, in gift giving. Over the years, the decades, occasionally Harry would drop by to present me with a book. These were not really objets trouvés. Rather than found objects, they were objects given." William Levy on artist, poet, zen boxer and vatic collector of exotic chairs Harry Hoogstraten.

GOING DOWN: THE ART OF TRACEY EMIN
October, 2001

"...I said I feel that if you want to learn about the world you don't sit around reading maps all days. I had this attitude that instead of going to another country or travelling, you just slept with someone. You'd learn more about different places by sleeping with someone than you would do by actually travelling, or learning another language." By Adrian Gargett.

PERVATEEN
September, 2002

"My initial curiosity was to the drug pervatin itself. I had never heard of it and wondered why it was only available in the Czech Republic. As I went on, the drug became less important and merely the common denominator that linked the people I chose to photograph. Their openness and rejection of everything that their parents had taught them was refreshing and was similar to how I felt when I was their age. It seems to be have been lost here in the West -- with the brilliant exception of the anti-globalization movement." Punk originator turned portrait artist Six tells Andrew Gallix about his controversial new exhibition in London.

LIVE NOW, WISE UP, DIE WELL: AN INTERVIEW WITH JUDY NYLON, PUNK LEGEND
October, 2001

I've always lived like a Samurai or at least like Alain Delon in the movie of that name. I already knew how to run a household smoothly. 'Don't waste wildness at home, put it in your work'. I'm paraphrasing Flaubert here."Brian Eno, John Cale, Roxy Music, The New York Dolls, Sid Vicious and his candy bars...they're all in Bart Plantenga's interview with punk legend Judy Nylon.

'GILBERT AND GEORGE' AT THE 'WHITE CUBE' GALLERY
September, 2001

"Our Art does not reflect life at all. You can't take one of these pictures out of this house and go and find the subject somewhere. We are reforming life, showing our tomorrows, we are not showing how life is." By Richard Marshall.


AMERICAN BRAVES & THE AMISH DOWN UNDER
December, 2000

"We had just set out for a tour of Lancaster, Pennsylvania – the Dutch Country. Two days and one night among the Amish... ...The Amish, their religion and the big open countryside were there for the benefit of the tourist -- the modern American Brave." By Andrew Gifford.

APPARENTDEPTH JOURNAL
December, 2000

Halloween, pregnancy, an inconclusive election, purple hair, Florida, weight loss and zits, a kiss-off letter and hairdo hell. Oh, and Natalie discovers that her life has been turned into an episode of Jerry Springer. The 3AM soap is back...with a vengeance!

NOTES FROM THE HOLLYWOOD UNDERGROUND
November, 2000

"Porn stars, whores, and she-males have congregated outside the cyclone fence and they’re waging bets like this was the WWF. It’s a regular hootenanny. Three black chicks are rapping like modern-day Supremes. Vampires with sunglasses have stepped out of the nearby bars and sniff the air like dogs. The smell of perfume and cologne mixes with the smell of garbage. I can see vials and bills exchanging hands." Hollywood's Dostoyevsky? By Carter McCormack.

APPARENTDEPTH JOURNAL MOVES TO 3AM
November, 2000 - ApparentDepth

Remember Natalie, the LA dancing queen who used to write her "Daily Depth" weblog in the now-defunct ApparentDepth? Well, she's back by popular demand. And this time round she's here at 3AM Magazine. Natalie, her job, her operation, her dance classes, her boyfriend, her ex-girlfriend . . . The 3AM soap starts here.

HANDI-CAPABLE CHOP SOCKEY
November 2000 - Big Pictures

"The use of the physically disabled/disfigured in film is almost as old as the cinema itself. Certainly the most famous instance of this phenomenon is Tod Browning's 1932 film FREAKS whose cast included dwarves, pinheads, bearded ladies and living torsos..." By Mike White.

THE FALL OF MAN
October, 2000

Lifestyles 
"When I was doing time at UMass, there was a seduction tactic we used to employ. We called it 'last man standing' and it worked on the simple notion that the last guy to leave a party or bar always got laid." By Justin Shaw.



NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET
October, 2000

Psychoanalysis? Feminism? Yes, it's James Brundage's review of Wes Craven's slasher classic Nightmare on Elm Street. James tears this one apart - Wes Craven, welcome to Nightmare in 3 A.M. Magazine. Now you know what it's like to be scared.


ART ATTACK: SARDAX IN RUBBERLAND INTERVIEW
August, 2000

Acclaimed S&M artist SARDAX tells Andrew Gallix that Art is a stern mistress.

DR. NO - 3 A.M. FILMS
August, 2000

"There's no business like show business, and nobody knows this like the men who made DR. NO." James Brundage deconstructs the James Bond phenomenon.

SATIRE - SURVIVOR BALTIMORE
August, 2000

"'Survivor: Baltimore' was simple. Twelve Americans and one Frenchman would be split into two groups and forced to survive on the streets of Baltimore." By Andrew Gifford.

SATIRE - WHEN I WAS APPROACHED BY 3 A.M. MAGAZINE TO WRITE A MONTHLY COLUMN
August, 2000

"Write about the whole writing problem," my friend advised me, "Then you can spend each month exploring the dark underside of your own twisted life. You'll be a sensation, baby!" By Andrew Gifford.

Entertainment - Commotion PicturesCOMMOTION PICTURES
APRIL, 2000

Mike White's got a big clock and queer tale to tell - that of Kenneth Fearing's novel and its subsequent screen adaptations :

"At least this time it's a man," Janoth quips. Yes, it seems that Pauline swings both ways.

"The Big Clock : A Study in Fundamentals"? A study in fundaments, more like, not to mention "unsatisfying climaxes" and "gay" old times.

THE ART GALLERY
APRIL, 2000

The Explosion When Both Ends Meet :

"The main theme in my work is ratio vs emotions. The struggle between head and heart, between sense and passion. The fear of going crazy, the explosion when both ends meet." 3 A. M. MAGAZINE showcases Marc Nolte's artwork.




 
fiction and poetry | literature | entertainment | politica | international | music | nonfiction
genre fiction | links | offers | contact | guidelines | advertise | webmasters
Copyright © 2002 - 2005, 3 AM Magazine. All Rights Reserved.