Fiction and Poetry 3am Magazine Contact Links Submission Guidelines
Literature
Arts
Politics
Nonfiction
Music
Buzzwords logo

BUZZWORDS

PEDDLING MIND PORN TO THE
CHATTERING CLASSES SINCE 2000
by Andrew Gallix and Utahna Faith

email correspondence to andrew@3ammagazine.com

Buzzwords home
Copyright © 3:AM Magazine 2005
   BritLitBlogs.com

3:AM linkroll

Recently
  • ANARCHY TV
  • A MOVEABLE VOID: TOM McCARTHY ON ALEX TROCCHI'S CAIN'S BOOK
  • 3:AM REVIEW: HOME IMPROVEMENT FOR CONDEMNED BUILDINGS
  • 3:AM TOP 5: PAT FISH
  • RE-ENACTMENTS RE-ENACTED
  • BAD FAITH
  • 3:AM REVIEWS: THE FREEDOM SPARK AND MODERN TIMES
  • 3:AM TOP 5: STEWART HOME
  • 3:AM REVIEW: THE FRATELLIS' COSTELLO MUSIC
  • 3:AM REVIEW: EATER LIVE IN LONDON

  • complete archives:

    3:AM links
     Buzzwords 2000-O5
     3:AM MySpace
     3:AM Magazine Pix
     Ambit
     Arete
     Bad Idea
     The Barcelona Review
     The Believer
     Blatt
     Bookmunch
     BritLitBlogs
     The Chap
     Complete Review
     Daniel Battams Fan Club
     Dreams That Money Can Buy
     The Enthusiast
     Exquisite Corpse
     Falling Into Fancy Fragments
     Full Moon Empty Sportsbag
     Laura Hird
     Identity Theory
     The Idler
     KGBBarLit
     Litro
     McSweeney's
     MetaxuCafe
     Nerve
     n+1
     Nude Magazine
     Paris Bitter Hearts Pit
     Pornlit
     Pulp.net
     ReadySteadyBook
     Salon
     Slate
     Slow Toe
     Smoke
     Smokelong Quarterly
     Spike
     STML
     Strange Attractor
     SuicideGirls
     Swink
     Trebuchet
     Underneath the Bunker
     Wild Strawberries
     wood s lot
     Word Riot

    Recent tags

      [22.10.06] [Andrew Gallix]
    UNDERGROUND, OVERGROUND
    The Village Voice has an interesting review (by Ed Halter) of Brandon Stosuy's Up is Up But So is Down:

    "The underground may be dead, replaced by innumerable pocket-worlds nurtured by niche marketing and the Internet. The old vertical clash of high and low has flipped sideways into a vast horizontal plain of isolated scenes. Yet even as today's post-bohemians float inside our own networked ego-spheres, the social phenomenon roughly traceable from William Blake to Kurt Cobain still retains a certain power. ...Some of us like our angels with dirty faces; witness the lovingly reproduced artifacts of Up Is Up But So Is Down: New York's Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992, a comprehensive compendium of below-14th Street literary productions by everyone from Laurie Anderson to Nick Zedd, focusing on the output of small magazines of the era like Koff, Bomb, and Between C and D. 'As a child my favorite books had been about women who entered the convent,' Tama Janowitz writes in 1986's Modern Saint 271, which would become the first chapter of her collection Slaves of New York, in the voice of a boho prostitute character. "They were giving themselves up to a higher cause. But there are no convents for Jewish girls." Lynne Tillman, in transcribed conversation with Gerard Malanga, offers an extension of the thesis: 'Punk is such a Catholic movement.' Amen to that. The era's literature is filled with confessions of sin, abject transgressions, lapses of faith, and the morbidity of flesh. All the sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll recorded here may be a fuck-you-dad reaction to the high-minded hopefulness of their '60s predecessors -- Thurston Moore remarks that the moment 'defined itself by trashing Led Zep, Pink Floyd et al.' -- but as much as punks hated hippies, their common romanticism proves them more alike than not. Cynicism is just optimism turned on its head, replacing a belief in the perfectability of humankind with a certitude that everything sucks. Janowitz styled her 'saints' after Kerouac's, no longer on the road but stuck in shit-hole apartments in drop-dead New York, and Richard Kostelanetz exhorts readers to 'find epiphanies anywhere, even in garbage cans.' The road to excess may lead to the palace of wisdom, even if in 1979 you'd get mugged en route.

    The predominant mode is diaristic reportage, frequently semi-fictionalized. The scene generated first-rate raconteurs -- Dennis Cooper, Eileen Myles, Cookie Mueller, and David Wojnarowicz, to name only some of the best-known included here -- whose stories meld dry satire with heart-churningly desperate transmissions of damaged humanity. ...But these writers aren't just letting it blurt. There's a formal elegance and inventiveness to many works, epitomized by Holly Anderson's marvelously concrete 'Color Stories,' told inside hand-drawn grids, each letter rub-transferred into its own square, like incomplete individuals filed inside tenement apartments. ...The trash-pickers, drug fiends, and unsuccored polysexual sensualists of
    Up Is Up embraced the darker side of the bohemian legacy..."

    There's an interview (from 2005) with East Village Eye founder Leonard Abrams in Gothamist:

    "First issue came out in May 1979. I was just feeling my way through it. I had worked for a community paper and the punk scene was morphing itself into the new wave scene and all these people were coming out of the woodwork -- it was a great time. There were performances, there was art, there was rock and roll and people were just showing up and meeting each other. These people who would work together, party together, have sex or maybe be at each other's throats were all just getting together and forming the East Village scene. ...The art kids started imitating the punk rockers. The art bands arrived and I just thought that this was definitely a scene that needs a paper".

    [permalink] | [0 comments]



    fiction and poetry | literature | arts | politics | music | nonfiction
    links | offers | contact | guidelines | advertise | webmasters

    Copyright © 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 3 AM Publishing. All Rights Reserved.