:: Interviews archive ( click for A-Z index)

Metacognition published 21/11/2015


Metacognition raises ethical questions, for instance: are all epistemic agents equally equipped to think correctly, and, hence, responsible for their judgments, as Descartes claimed? Or rather, is their social environment responsible for the existence and appropriate use of their critical abilities? This kind of question can now be posed in much more exact terms, thanks to the empirical science of metacognition.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Joëlle Proust.

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Interview with The Scofield published 05/11/2015

The Scofield interview

It’s been a long gestating project, but what really got the journal in motion was Scott Cheshire and Dustin Illingworth telling me to either make it or shut up about it. They loved the idea about harkening back to a bygone era while also making it look toward the future.

David Burr Gerrard interviews Tyler Malone, Editor-in-Chief of The Scofield.

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Art, Writing, and the Untellable: Douglas Messerli interviews Wendy Walker published 04/11/2015


One night in the fall of 1974, I sat down to do my daily writing stint, but I was having some pain, so I took what I found in the medicine cabinet—a pill for toothache. While I was putting down the first sentence I remember saying to myself, “If Kafka can start a story this way, so can I.” A couple of wonderful hours’ writing later, I realized I had the beginning of a book.

Independent publisher and writer Douglas Messerli speaks with writer and artist Wendy Walker about writing, reception, art, and their literary friendship.

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A Radical Homosexual Refutes the Implicit Sexuality of a Young Woman in Appalling Black Glasses: M. Kitchell on the Topics of Solar Luxuriance and Publishing in the Twenty-First Century published 03/11/2015

Solar Luxuriance

I’m much more interested in publishing works that fit the idea of what I think books should do. I believe that the function of books lies beyond representational language, beyond being an easy way to encounter language, and there aren’t many presses doing anything interesting with that. But then again, there don’t seem to be many writers doing things like that.

Jarett Kobek interviews M. Kitchell from Solar Luxuriance.

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The Indie Press Interviews 1: Charles Boyle published 14/10/2015


If you’ve got an office with the water-coolers and the sofas, and have staff, you have to sell a heck of a lot of books to maintain that situation. I’m not paying staff, I don’t work from an office: I have almost no overheads. My expenses are printing bills and small author advances, usually around £200 against 10% royalties, sometimes a little more. Small presses don’t have big risks. If a mainstream publisher publishes a book and it doesn’t sell, it’s considered a mistake. If I publish a book and it doesn’t sell, hey, nobody’s lost their livliehood, nobody’s drowned. It was something I thought was worth doing. You see, I don’t see it as my business to sell thousands of books. It sounds a bit naive, but I see publishing as a continuation of my reading and writing. They blur into one another. I am just sharing what I enthuse about.

James Tookey interviews Charles Boyle, author and founder of CB Editions.

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Waking, Dreaming, Being published 04/10/2015


One of the fascinating and valuable things about the Indian philosophical tradition is that it has sophisticated and technical debates, spanning centuries, about whether dreamless sleep is a peculiar mode of consciousness or whether it’s a state in which consciousness is absent. Both Advaita Vedānta philosophers (Advaitins) and Buddhist philosophers argued that a subtle form of awareness continues in deep sleep (though they disagreed about the nature of this awareness), whereas the Nyāya philosophers (Nyaiyāyikas) held that consciousness is absent from dreamless sleep.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Evan Thompson.

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Time, Language, Ontology published 19/09/2015


Nobody, however, takes the need for spatially variable terms—spatial indexicals—to have any implications about the nature of space itself. Everyone cheerfully accepts that though it is pragmatically necessary to divide space up into the ‘here’ and the ‘there’, space itself is perfectly isotropic; there is no such-thing as an observe-independent ‘here’. Space is not centered, even though our orientation toward space requires us (most of the time) to center our representation of it upon ourselves. This is just one of the ways in which, we all agree, our normal ways of thinking about space come apart from the way it is itself.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Joshua Mozersky.

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Italian philosophy, Magic and Peter of Spain published 12/09/2015


By the time Italian fascism hit bottom in the late thirties, intimidated by Hitler and promulgating its own disgraceful racial laws, Gentile was no longer a major force in the regime or the Party, which he never renounced. Gentile had immense philosophical talent – more focused than Croce’s, whose range was broader, less committed to philosophy. The grand historical narrative of Italian philosophy – with the politics of nation-building as its armature – is still Gentile’s. His metaphysics of actual idealism or actualism is a strikingly original attempt to naturalize (speaking very broadly) idealism.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Brian Copenhaver.

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From the Point Of View of the Universe published 06/09/2015


“The point of view of the universe” is to symbolize an impartial concern for everyone. Sidgwick calls for impartiality in ethics and thinks that when deciding what we ought to do, we should try to take an impartial perspective – not mine, not yours, not my children’s but “the point of view of the universe”.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek.

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Naturalism’s Final Causes published 29/08/2015


I consider myself to be a metaphysical naturalist, despite the fact that I agree with some of the claims the Horwich makes. I do think that there are different epistemic tools that one can use other than the scientific method, as I mentioned above with regards to the intentional stance. But I don’t think that a commitment to these epistemic claims leads to any strange ontological commitments, like the existence of anything over and above the natural world. This probably makes me a committed naturalist still trying to find her way through the wilderness.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Bana Bashour.

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