:: Interviews archive ( click for A-Z index)

no one can jump over his own shadow published 08/12/2014

Heidegger was a bad reader of Sartre (and remember, it was Jean Beaufret who interpreted Sartre for him) when he claimed that the difference between them was that for Sartre “We are in a situation where there are only human beings,” whereas for Heidegger “We are in a situation where there is principally being.”

Introducing the launch of the Heidegger Research Series, Richard Polt and Gregory Fried interview Professor Thomas Sheehan.

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the metaphysics of logic published 05/12/2014

One important thing that non-classical logics have done that classical logic has not (although, who knows, it may have, had Frege lived longer) is, after stepping carefully in problematic domains, to revise or rebuild completely in the light of suspicious results: classical paradoxes or limitations in areas like quantum physics, the foundations of mathematics, and plain old everyday reasoning in inconsistent or even just possibly inconsistent situations – have all inspired non-classical logics, and as a result we now have logics offering more nuanced and accurate models of deduction across at least some contexts and at most, more contexts than those classical logic can handle.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Penny Rush.

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Writing Outside Philosophy: An Interview with Simon Critchley published 03/12/2014

What I learned from Derrida very early on — my master’s thesis was on the question of whether we could overcome metaphysics — is that the step outside philosophy always falls back within the orbit of that which it tries to exceed. Not to philosophize is still to philosophize. Similarly, any text or philosophy that simply asserts the value of metaphysics is internally dislocated against itself, undermining its own founding gesture. This leave us writing on the margin between the inside and the ouside of philosophy, which is where I’d like to place Memory Theatre.

Andrew Gallix interviews Simon Critchley.

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Art is Love is God published 01/12/2014

While I was in Japan writing The Plum, Lun*na’s father purchased a boombox for me. Unlike the U.S., Japan is full of rental shops that not only rent[ed] VHS – remember this was 1989 – but also CDs. So, for ¥200, you could rent a CD and go home to make a copy of it on cassette. Japan sold blank cassettes that fit the time of an entire album. I spent a lot of time at the rental CD shop in Moji-Ko. I remember coming across Yellow Magic Orchestra. YMO didn’t impress me as much as Omni Sight Seeing, a solo album by one of its members, Haruomi Hosono. I taped this CD from my boombox. The album, even when I hear it now, brings back the memory of life in Moji-Ko as well as writing The Plum In Mr. Blum’s Pudding.

Penny-Ante editorial director Rebekah Weikel interviews TamTam Books publisher Tosh Berman.

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Paradoxes published 29/11/2014

I encounter people who are dealing with paradoxical situations in their own lives. One woman, for example, told me that she is now wondering whether she is living with the same person she married twenty years ago. “He’s the same man, of course,” she admitted, “but he has changed so drastically, I’m not really sure he’s the same person.”

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Margaret Cuonzo.

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An Ultimate You: Fantasyscapes and Youtube Aesthetics published 28/11/2014

I was also into the idea of referencing homemade youtube videos. So it was really mad low tech effects and the kind of thing that you get teenagers uploading to youtube. With the new films – A Whole New World and Please Sir – I was looking at reference points for landscapes, digital cgi landscapes, and kind of looking more to that video game aesthetic. It doesn’t look real but it seems to have developed its own reality. It’s a hyperreality – so detailed that it doesn’t match what we see in real life.

Ivan Knapp interviews the artist, filmmaker and 2013 Margaret Tait award winner, Rachel Maclean.

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“an accidental novel”: Iain Sinclair interviewed published 26/11/2014

The 70 x 70 book is more than just a record of this filmic dérive around London, it is a repertory cinema season on paper, the SCALA brought back to life in print; a revival of the world of wall-charts peppered with classics by Fritz Lang, Douglas Sirk, Godard, unheralded oddities, all-nighters interrupted at 4am by a punk band to keep you awake. But it is also a form of autobiography, weaving a path through Sinclair’s life and work as he discusses the background to each selection, or “an accidental novel”, as he describes it.

John Rogers interviews Iain Sinclair on his 70×70 book.

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On The Romantic Absolute published 21/11/2014

Schlegel’s claim is that philosophy does not concern any one topic, nor does it amount to any one conception of truth or reality; rather, it is in a state of eternal conflict, such that it is only by grasping the various conflicts within philosophy––determining the ways they emerged, and were resolved or dissipated––that we can grasp what philosophy is about.Schlegel similarly argues that literature must be understood through its history. In his lectures on the history of European literature he maintains that “the new cannot be understood without the old,” because “literature can only be understood as a whole.” In other words, in order to understand the nature of literature one must grasp the history of literature.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Dalia Nassar.

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Parts, wholes, abstracts, tropes and ontology published 14/11/2014

A book may be part of the library and a page part of the book, but the page is intuitively not part of the library. By contrast, if an amount of rice is part of a larger amount of rice, which in turn is part of a dish, the first amount of rice is still part of the dish. This is because amounts of rice are not integrated wholes, whereas books are.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Friederike Moltmann.

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powers, Aristotle and the incarnation published 08/11/2014

Powers are properties that enable their bearer to bring about or suffer change. Each (type of) power is defined by the (type of) change it is ‘responsible’ for. The change is the manifestation of the nature of the power. Importantly, manifesting is one of the two different states a power may be in; the other is being inactive. Powers are real even if never manifesting. Even a changeless universe may be powerful.

Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Anna Marmodoro .

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