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BUZZWORDS

PEDDLING MIND PORN TO THE
CHATTERING CLASSES SINCE 2000
by Andrew Gallix and Utahna Faith

email correspondence to andrew@3ammagazine.com

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Copyright © 3:AM Magazine 2005
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      [12.9.05] [Andrew Gallix]
    THE MISSING LINKS
    Craig Johnson of Spike Magazine publishes an interview with Ralph Steadman. Among other very interesting things, they discuss Stirner and Rabelais. There's also more on Hunter S Thompson's suicide note and all that from the BBC: "Last month, his ashes were scattered by fireworks shot from a cannon. Actor Johnny Depp, who played Thompson in a film version of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, paid for the cannon". * Did you know that this is Agatha Christie week? * Melvyn Bragg's Twelve Books That Changed the World: ""When people think of things that change the world, they tend to think of extraordinary events: the assassination of leaders; the invasion of countries; the havoc wreaked by natural disasters. All extremely dramatic, but there is something less attention-grabbing but just as powerful -- books." Among the "Twelve Books", one finds The First Rule Book of the Football Association (1863) and Patent Specification for Arkwright's Spinning Machine (1769). * Following on from my last Missing Links: the Gogol Bordello blog. * Elaine Showalter on academic novels: "Yet strangely enough, what appeals to me most in academic fiction is its seriousness, even sadness. Perhaps we professors turn to satire because academic life has so much pain, so many lives wasted or destroyed. On the spelling corrector on my computer, when I click on English, the alternative that comes up is anguish. Like the suburbs, the campus can be the site of pastoral, or the fantasy of pastoral -- the refuge, the ivory tower. But also like the suburbs, it is the site of those perennials of the literary imagination John Updike names as 'discontent, conflict, waste, sorrow, fear'". * Vintage celebrate its fifteenth birthday. * Chris from the aforementioned Spike Magazine draws our attention to Third Eye Books whose website he has been working on (Chris is also the author of the new Buzzwords site you are currently perusing). They publish Antony Crofts' Justin Aveneer, "an inverted pastiche of de Sade's Justine, with a male protagonist living in a world where women treat men as work objects, in all the ways that, historically, men have regarded women as sex objects" which Angela Carter seems to have ripped off. * The Literary Saloon on Houellebecq's success. * Janet Street-Porter hits back at Zadie Smith: "It's funny that Zadie loathes being recognised so much because in the new issue of British Vogue on sale tomorrow, she's gritted her teeth and consented to be photographed for a fashion spread in a clinging halter-necked satin evening gown with flowers in her hair". And here's Smith in Vogue: "I like men a great deal, but they are weak and it's just silly to expect them to be something they're not". Fascinating.

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