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BUZZWORDS

PEDDLING MIND PORN TO THE
CHATTERING CLASSES SINCE 2000
by Andrew Gallix and Utahna Faith

email correspondence to andrew@3ammagazine.com

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Copyright © 3:AM Magazine 2005
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      [17.9.05] [Andrew Gallix]
    THE MISSING LINKS
    Jay McInerney on that old chestnut -- the death of the novel: "I write novels. In fact, I just finished one, which is one reason I was alarmed to hear VS Naipaul declaring recently, in an interview with the New York Times, that the novel was dead. Which would make me, I guess, a necrophiliac". * Carl Barat's new band. * Philadelphia's 215 Festival runs from 5-9 October. * Neal Pollack, who will be appearing at the aforementioned 215 Festival, is interviewed in Gelf Magazine: "GM: What was the last book to make you laugh out loud? NP: The last book that made me laugh out loud was Motherless Brooklyn. Hilarious. Nothing is funnier than a detective from Brooklyn with Tourette's syndrome. Funniest thing I've ever read in my life. Also the new Salman Rushdie novel, Shalimar: the Clown. GM: Really? NP: Well, it's about a clown. How could a book with the word 'clown' in the title not be funny? GM: I'm not sure what I think about Salman Rushdie. NP: I was kidding about Rushdie". (See our 2002 interview.) * Alan Hollinghurst reviews Edmund White's autobiography (My Lives): "For White sex is a primary mystery, but he can see the funny side of it. He is funny about S&M and the inconvenient disjunctions of fantasy from normal day-to-day life: ordered by a 'master' on a website to relocate to Cleveland and live in a cage for the rest of his life, he thinks: 'But I must finish my semester at Princeton, then there's Rome in June and Provence in July...' When a 29-year-old Latvian commands him to eat biscuits from a bowl and have a dog's tail permanently attached to his backside, White thinks 'that sounded tempting', before more practical considerations intervene ('These men are serious')". More in The Observer: "The Elizabethans believed that every orgasm shortened your life by a day. White incorrigibly demonstrates that they were wrong". * Paul Morley: "Touching Peel's copy of the Undertones' 'Teenage Kicks' -- a cracking example of the novelty pop song as scintillating reportage, where innocence is conveyed as ultimate experience -- was somewhere between erotic and intrusive". * Indie girls pix. * More on Kerouac's lost play. * Beatnik fashion. * You'll find interviews with Alasdair Gray and Rodge Glass (the Scottish novelist's assistant) on Dee Rimbaud's site. * A daily dose of London street fashion. * More Bret Easton Ellis: "You have to identify ultimately with everyone you write about, and I definitely identified with Patrick Bateman. I completely understood his rage; I understood his misery; I thought his anger was justified; I thought his disgust at the society that he was a part of was in fact the right reaction, and is what drove him mad". More here. Check out the author's official site. * Jessa Crispin (of Bookslut fame) wonders when will authors learn that the internet is not their enemy?: "Poor Jeffrey Eugenides. At a reading sponsored by the Harold Washington Library in Chicago, Eugenides began carrying on about how the Internet and iPods are killing off literature. Evidently he thinks that people sit around in the evenings thinking, 'Hmm. I wonder what I should do tonight: download some porn off the Internet, or get started reading Lolita. Porn or a book? Porn or a book?' He seemed awfully young to give in to a lifetime of waving a cane yelling, 'You damn kids!'" * Franz Ferdinand's Alex Kapranos turns food critic. * Steve Almond on Lolita at fifty: "There is no need to belabor the plot of Lolita (man meets girl, man seduces girl, man loses girl -- that about does it) nor the oft-cited symbolism (old, refined Europe seduced by young, vulgar America). What matters, in the end, is the heartsick love song of Monsieur Humbert. ...To be overrun by feeling, yet able to marshal words with such elegance and precision -- this was Nabokov's knack. That he did so on behalf of a quivering pervert makes the achievement that much more astonishing. ...In our covert hearts, we root for him (Humbert Humbert), because he loves her, and because, when you come right down to it, most of our own wishes are illicit, or feel that way to us". * Agatha Christie's home in Devon to be opened to the public. * The Small Wonder Festival (Charleston, East Sussex, England) ("The short story festival") ends today. * Did you know that Dave Goodman had died earlier this year? * Christopher Hitchens vs George Galloway? Yawn! * Nick Park profiled. * The man who decides what we read. * dogmatika (which is going all Missing Links on us) brings us news of the Brian Eno/Michel Faber collaboration. Another review of Faber's The Farenheit Twins. * The bus we loved. * Iain Sinclair interviewed in The Independent on Sunday.

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